Local nonprofit provides annual scholarship for nursing assistants

Last month, the Healthcare Industry Professionals Serving Seniors of Winston-Salem (HIPSS) donated $2,000 for students interested in becoming certified nursing assistants.

“We are grateful to the Healthcare Industry Professionals Serving Seniors for this ongoing scholarship,” said Janet Spriggs, president of Forsyth Tech. “Through this assistance, our students will have opportunities to obtain careers paying sustainable wages, especially now when healthcare workers are vital to our community.”

To qualify, students must be a resident of Forsyth, Stokes, Surry, Yadkin, Davie, Davidson, or Guilford counties and must be enrolled in the current semester. Funds will be allocated based on financial need and qualifications of the individual selected by the Forsyth Tech Scholarship Committee. The scholarship recipients must agree to work as a certified medical assistant for a minimum of one year.

“HIPSS is so pleased to be able to help with the training for certified nursing assistants. We sincerely hope to encourage more people to enter this very important and rewarding career. It is vital to the seniors we serve to have these compassionate professionals to provide care in their golden years of life,” said HIPSS President Cissy McCoy, administrator of Trinity Glen.

Forsyth Tech offers health education programs for Certified Nursing Assistant I and II, and offers refresher courses for both of these programs. For more information on the Nursing Assistant programs, current and prospective students may contact the Health Education Department at 336.734.7794 or by email at ewdhealtheducation@forsythtech.edu. These entry-level positions will allow you to begin a career that could lead, with further training and education, to greater levels of skill and responsibility. For more information on the scholarship, please contact Angela Cook, director of donor relations.

Healthcare Industry Professionals Serving Seniors (HIPSS) was formed in 2007 with a focus on improving communication between agencies serving seniors, educating their staff, and improving services across the board.

Ransomware attacks are on the rise. Here’s what that means for schools.

In late August, Haywood County Schools was hit with a ransomware attack on the first day that elementary students were set to begin online instruction. The hackers gained access to the district’s computer systems and demanded money for the return of sensitive data, shutting down remote instruction in the district for a full week.

Haywood County is not alone — the attack was one of five ransomware attacks on North Carolina school districts in 2020. For comparison, only one district, Columbus County Schools, was attacked from 2016 to 2019. These attacks also impact community colleges, county governments, and other entities. In July 2019, a cyber attack shut down Richmond Community College.

As many students across the state engage in some form of remote learning due to COVID-19, cybersecurity is more important than ever. What is a ransomware attack, and what can schools do to guard themselves against one? We turned to Forsyth Technical Community College for answers.

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Getting to Know Joey Bryant

Joey with Book Favorite Pic

author, professor, department chair, Davis iTEC/Cyber Security Center and program coordinator – IT-Healthcare Informatics

Joey recently co-authored the book Principles of Information Systems. Here she shares her experience and background.

Question:

How did you get involved in writing the textbook?

Answer:

I had talked with Cengage at a conference two years ago about the content of a book that I was using and gave some suggestions for updated content. They called me last year and asked me to write for a different book, Principles of Information Systems, The original author of the book had passed and they needed someone who was passionate about information technology and had a desire to write. They had one chapter with a title and wanted to add an additional chapter for artificial intelligence. I was excited, as this was something that I have always wanted to do.

Question:

How long was the writing process?

Answer:

The entire process – writing, editing, revising – took about 10 months to complete. It is a lot of work and research. The entire process is extremely detailed, and I was working nights and weekends to meet deadlines.

 Question:

Are you from North Carolina and where did you grow up?

Answer:

I was born in Greensboro and moved to Mount Airy as a teenager.

Question:

What are your academic degrees and where did you graduate?

Answer:

AAS – Business Computer Programming from Surry Community College

BS – Computer Information Systems – High Point University

MBA – High Point University

Post-Masters Certification in IT – University of North Carolina Greensboro 

Question:

How long have you been at Forsyth Tech?   

Answer:

I have been at Forsyth Tech for 11 years, one adjunct year and 10 full-time

Question:

Did you start as an instructor? 

Answer:

I began at Forsyth Tech as an adjunct instructor in 2009. In 2010, I became a full-time instructor, In 2012, I obtained the position of Program Coordinator and in 2019 became a Department Chair.

Question:

Were you in industry before becoming an instructor?

Answer:

Yes, I worked in the Information Technology industry for 20 years before I began my career in education.

Question:

What interested you in information technology and what do you enjoy most about it?

 

Answer:

I was raised with technology, watching my father who was in the industry.  I started taking classes at Surry Community College at night during high school, as programming classes were not offered in high schools at the time. The process of designing a system and then watching it come to life was fascinating to me, and still is. Seeing your creation work and help others do their jobs more efficiently is such a satisfying feeling.

 

Question:

How many classes do you teach and what do you enjoy most about teaching?

Answer:

Each semester varies, but I teach four to six classes each semester. I enjoy teaching because I love to learn. I want the students to get as excited about technology as I am and to instill in them that life-long desire to learn. Watching a student accomplish their goals is as satisfying to me as a teacher as it was for me as a student. 

Question:

What are some of your outside interests/hobbies?

Answer:

When I am not at work, I spend a lot of time with family and friends.  I love to go fishing, camping, reading. I also sing with my church’s choir and praise team.